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  • Article: Nov 28, 2019
    By Dr Peter Hirst in Congleton Chronicle

    Dear Sir,

    With the general election rapidly approaching, it will soon be time for your readers to decide how they are going to vote.

    The Liberal Democrats offer a strong, distinct message on the main issue of this election, namely whether we remain in or leave the European Union.

    Whatever deal or none the other two parties manage to negotiate, it will not be as good as the one we already have inside the largest free trade association on the planet.

  • Article: Nov 14, 2019
    By Dr Peter Hirst in Congleton Chronicle

    Dear Sir,

    Now that we know that there will be a general election on 12th December, your readers will start thinking about who to give their vote.

    They only have one under our antiquated system, so it becomes even more important to choose wisely.

    The obvious - though not the only criteria - is which candidate best refl ects their views on the important issues.

  • Article: Nov 9, 2019

    Dear Sir,

    The real miracle is that despite our extravagance and indeed indulgence, we still have a chance of saving this planet for future generations if we act wisely (RS Norbury p33 last week's Chronicle).

    Though no expert, my reading of the science is that we can still ensure our survival if we act quickly and boldly enough.

  • Article: Oct 31, 2019
    By Dr Peter Hirst in Congleton Chronicle

    Dear Sir,

    In response to the first part of Sylvia Dyke's letter (Chronicle, 24th October), we are where we are and though interesting it is not particularly useful to explore and analyse the past.

    The country enjoys a more diverse electorate than it did at the time she describes that offers us unique opportunities to experience different cultures and has, for the most part, encompassed our values that perhaps were the reasons they came in the fi rst place.

    Whatever happened, it was unlikely that we would hold onto the quality of life that we enjoyed in the 50s and 60s, born of our success in part by exploiting other countries and their inhabitants.

    Technology has moved on and we are able, if we encompass it fully, to communicate online with people in countries most of us will never visit and enjoy scenes and stories from them that enrich our lives.

    Though employment is less secure, most of us can enjoy our leisure time in a wide variety of ways some of which our ancestors could only dream of.

  • Article: Oct 24, 2019
    By Dr Peter Hirst in Congleton Chronicle

    Dear Sir,

    With respect to Connor Brady's recent letter in the Chronicle, both Labour and the Conservatives, with last week's Queen's Speech, are attempting to move on from the Brexit debate.

    They know that their respective stances are losing public support and that most people are now in favour of remaining in the European Union.

  • Article: Oct 10, 2019
    By Dr Peter Hirst in Congleton Chronicle

    Dear Sir,

    Sam Corcoran, (page 32 in last week's Chronicle) and indeed the Labour Party still do not grasp that leaving in any form is worse than remaining in the EU.

    How does he know that his (Labour's) deal will be any better than the one negotiated by Theresa May?

    He, or at least his party, wants to put the deal his party negotiates to the people in a referendum.

  • Article: Oct 5, 2019
    By Dr Peter Hirst in Congleton Chronicle

    Dear Sir,

    Your editorial on climate change, excellent as it was, omits some important issues.

    The three possibly most important things we can do to help reduce our carbon emissions are having less children, stop fl ying and reducing our meat consumption.

    They are all challenging but if this is an emergency, surely drastic measures are needed.

  • Article: Sep 26, 2019

    Dear Sir,

    It might be thought that leaving the EU would make us more self-sufficient in the long run.

    This is because our basic necessities will come from a wider variety of sources, further away than presently.

    This will make our food, medical and other essential supplies less secure, especially if there is conflict or other barriers to trade on a wide scale.

  • Article: Sep 12, 2019
    By Dr Peter Hirst in Congleton Chronicle

    Dear Sir,

    If I might be allowed to take a rather different tack, your letters about Brexit in last week's Chronicle make a strong case for a written down set of rules for how our country is governed.

    However people voted in 2016, they must agree that the following three years have been chaotic.

    We have been subjected to a continual barrage of news as the various actors have sought to get their way, helped by the fact that they can make up their own rules as they go along.

  • Article: Aug 29, 2019
    By Dr Peter Hirst in Congleton Chronicle

    Dear Sir,

    It's all very well for Robert Davies, (p32 in last week's Chronicle) to say all we have to do is remain savvy, I presume in relation to the results of a no-deal Brexit that the Conservative administration is trying to impose on us.

    He does not mention those who, for various reasons, are only just coping at the present time to provide a wholesome diet for their families.